DOCUMENTARY VIDEO PROJECTS

WHEN SEEING IS NOT ALWAYS BELIEVING

CROSSING BOUNDARIES: CROSS CULTURE VIDEO PROJECT FOR PEACE 2010

dvd_crossing_halfBased on our Cross Culture Video Making Project for Peace: Crossing Boundaries 2010, the DVD contains 6 (six) documentary videos produced during the course of the program.

CONTENTS

  • Sutadi Sudah Tak Di Sini (Marthin Luther Sessa)
  • Kampung Tugu, Bayang Masa Lalu (Teuku Raja Umar)
  • Kemarin (Syaiful Anwar)
  • Sebelum Adzan Subuh (Tiara Salampessy)
  • Lapo (Andang Kelana)
  • Tamil (Ronaldiaz Hartantyo)

The DVD is available on a Print-on-Demand (POD) basis.

 

 

 

POMATODON [ OF THE TREE/OFF THE MAP LAND]: DOCUMENTARY PROJECT IN SEMBAKUNG, NUNUKAN, EAST KALIMANTAN IN 2009

PomatodonProduced in 2009 Pomatodon is our second documentary video based on the issues of minority rights and multiculturalism. It beautifully captures the dilemma faced by two different minority ethnic communities, Dayak Todung pomatodonwith the majority of the population being moslem and Dayak Agabag which is Protestant in majority, nestled in the hinterland of Sembakung subdistrict of district Nunukan, East Kalimantan, in dealing with the government policy on land and forest where they live for ages since their ancestors. The title, Pomatodon, taken from local tree popularly also known as Pohon Madu, inscribes a message on the bleak future of the people in the area due to a state project through which the authority forces the conversion from traditional plantation to acacia to meet demand from the industry. In 52 minutes the video brings us the pictures of misery, tragic moments, and comical characters.

 

 

 

 

TO MOMPALIVU BURE [KISAH ORANG-ORANG PENCARI GARAM]: DOCUMENTARY PROJECT IN WANA COMMUNITY IN MOROWALI NATIONAL NATURAL PRESERVE IN 2008

Click here to read the complete review tomompalivubure_1st-documentary

To Mompalivu Bure is a documentary video based on an audio-visual research in Wana community in Morowali Nature Reservation Park, Central Sulawesi. It sketches out the dynamics of Wana People community–they call themselves as Ta’ Tribe–who are facing challenges brought about through social, cultural and economic contacts with outside environment.

Earlier contacts between Wana people and outside world came about mainly through trades. For their daily life, Wana society/ people depend heavily on forest commodities, most notably from collecting rattan and resin. The Wana people simply collect the goods manually and transport it to Marisa, where broker await and later sell the commodities in the nearest market at Kolonedale.

The movie shows the differences among Wana people when responding to challenges and changes that occur around them. As Wana people inhabit a vast area in the Nature reservation zone, the film captures only three locations where Wana community resides, namely in Marisa, Kayupoli and Taronggo, with Kayupoli as the remotest among the three. The Wana community who live in Kayupoli sells resin or rattan in Marisa, therefore Marisa can be considered their ‘economic frontier zone’.

From Marisa the commodities are then transported and traded in the market in Kolonedale, a sub district town in the district of Morowali. Meanwhile, a story of Toronggo represents intense encounters between the Wana and the modern world, where various institutions, i.e. education facilities, health centers, and religious traits have existed thus play important roles in the daily life of the Wana. Toronggo settlement also shows the multi dimensions of development project. To some, settlement program is regarded as pulling the Wana people out of their traditional roots. To some others, the program is seen as a window of opportunity for the Wana to experience change and ‘progress’.

The movie shows how Wana people faces or confront resettlement program, with outside ‘agents’ play different and yet significant roles in the process. Other than NGO s (Non Government Organizations) and religious bodies, intellectual and government roles are prominent in shaping the contemporary world of the Wana people. Investors are also play decisive factor which alters the life of the Wana, with oil palm plantation in Taronggo as an icon of their involvement in a wider market economy. As a result the dependency of Wana people with consumption goods which signify modern society is getting bigger.

Based on our previous research conducted in 2005, the movie also tries to illustrate the historical encounter of local community with modern Indonesia and modernity. They respond diversely to it, with each group who live in different locations pose different strategy to meet both external changes and those which resulted from their internal dynamics.

Since 2005 the Interseksi foundation, supported by the Tifa foundation, has conducted research in several local communities in various parts of Indonesian archipelago. The research is mainly aimed to find solid ground for the arguments in advocating minority rights and in critically discussing the problematic multiculturalism in Indonesia. To Mompalivu Bure is a part of our efforts to highlight some problematic agenda of the state’s development trajectories in dealing with local communities in various parts of the country. It is a part of our efforts in facilitating renegotiation of the nation with its subaltern sub-nation nations. Hopefully the movie will be of some use for the policy maker and people who are concerned with issues of minority rights, particularly those whose main concern is with local communities and local politics.